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Processing plant making bio fuel from waste wood chips

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CANADA BIOFUEL
LENGTH: 3:24
SOURCE: AP TELEVISION NEWS
RESTRICTIONS: TECNOLOGY CLIENTS ONLY

1. Various of biofuel producer Andrew Kingston at computer
2. Exterior of biofuel producing plant
3. Biofuel producer Andrew Kingston at computer
4. Various computer graphics showing biofuel production process
5. Bio oil being poured
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Kingston, biofuel producer:
"We are starting to produce bio oil on a commercial basis now. We are the first company to do so for a fuel application. As we extend into other markets and build other plants, the impact will become greater and hopefully in the next few years, more significant."
7. Interior saw mill
8. Various of wood being cut
9. Various of piles of sawdust
10. Interior of office
11. Various computer graphics of biofuel production process
12. Pan over plant
13. Close up Bio Oil sign
14. Various of Bio oil being poured
15. Pan exterior plant
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Kingston, biofuel producer:
"There are industries that have certain requirements to reduce their emissions profile. So we can allow them to have an asset that would be out of compliance, to maintain it's compliance and its applicability and operational capabilities beyond the normal line because of the emission profiles."
17. Kingston inspecting machines
18. Various of equipment
19. Magellan turbine
20. Man unlocking doors of turbine to show interior
21. Various of interior of turbine
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Kingston, biofuel producer:
"We produce a fuel that can be burned directly without having to refine it, we can produce it in remote areas and burn it directly in remote areas. So we avoid transportation costs. Picture an island economy that is importing fuel. We can take bio-mass from that island, produce fuel, create local jobs, create local infrastructure investment, displace fossil fuel imports and do it in an environmentally-friendly manner."
23. Various Kingston outside plant
24. Kingston inside plant
25. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Kingston, biofuel producer:
"We built this plant within an existing facility that has been built almost a hundred years ago. So you have 19th century technology and 21st century applications."
26. Various exteriors of plant
SUGGESTED LEAD IN
One man's dream in Canada is to be a fuel visionary -- the person who came up with the magic replacement for fossil fuels.
A multi-million dollar bio oil plant is the first key step in Andrew Kingston's dream.
VOICEOVER
This multi-million dollar bio-oil plant in Canada converts tons of wood chips into environmentally-friendly bio-oil every day.
Bio-oil made from wood chips doesn't harm the environment to the same degree as fossil fuels, according to the developer, Andrew Kingston.
It also doesn't emit poisonous sulphur dioxide and is cheaper than fossil fuel.
It costs approximately $25-30 US dollars a barrel.
A challenge with many biofuels is being able to produce them on a large-scale.
However, Kingston's company is doing just that.
SOUNDBITE (English)
"We are starting to produce bio oil on a commercial basis now. We are the first company to do so for a fuel application. As we extend into other markets and build other plants, the impact will become greater and hopefully in the next few years, more significant."
SUPERCAPTION: Andrew Kingston, biofuel producer
The plant is in West Lorne, Ontario and has been built alongside a 100 year old flooring company, Erie Flooring.
The company produces 70 tons of sawdust a day as a waste by-product.
This dried wood chip waste serves as the raw material for Kingston's bio-oil.
Known as 'bio mass', the wood chips are suddenly heated to a very high temperature in an oxygen-free environment and then rapidly cooled.


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