Ultrasonic transducer testing of bubble coalescence in hho Torch

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This video is the revision of an video of an old aussie friend we know as m3scal check out his channel . the topic is ultrasonics waves boring holes in plastic??? a discovery in this test to shows that ultrasonic waves will bore into plastic and or melt the impact zone directly in the center of a piezoelectric transducer. this video is to aid the design of bubble coalescence devices and machines that require the use of ultra sonic waves. it shows us what not to do this is a failure video, the device needs about 30watts of ultrasonics or maybe a little more this unit is around 13 watts . please leave scientific comments only .
Ultrasonic transducers are transducers that convert ultrasound waves to electrical signals or vice versa. Those that both transmit and receive may also be called ultrasound transceivers; many ultrasound sensors besides being sensors are indeed transceivers because they can both sense and transmit. These devices work on a principle similar to that of transducers used in radar and sonar systems, which evaluate attributes of a target by interpreting the echoes from radio or sound waves, respectively. Active ultrasonic sensors generate high-frequency sound waves and evaluate the echo which is received back by the sensor, measuring the time interval between sending the signal and receiving the echo to determine the distance to an object. Passive ultrasonic sensors are basically microphones that detect ultrasonic noise that is present under certain conditions, convert it to an electrical signal, and report it to a computer.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0h42yRWIt0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Va3uKE_RTOQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YErKnzyjxr4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odfJuwWoq6E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uti3vhwtYHQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtM4EB3zhn4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e70jQ4nND0Q
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZk0EuuXCiU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c76yT2DslP8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V5ZC5LsWhI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFl_8r29Y00
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a17oIbkUWDQ

Systems typically use a transducer which generates sound waves in the ultrasonic range, above 18 kHz, by turning electrical energy into sound, then upon receiving the echo turn the sound waves into electrical energy which can be measured and displayed.

The technology is limited by the shapes of surfaces and the density or consistency of the material. Foam, in particular, can distort surface level readings.[1]

This technology, as well, can detect approaching objects and track their positions.

Transducers[edit]

Sound field of a non focusing 4 MHz ultrasonic transducer with a near field length of N = 67 mm in water. The plot shows the sound pressure at a logarithmic db-scale.

Sound pressure field of the same ultrasonic transducer (4 MHz, N = 67 mm) with the transducer surface having a spherical curvature with the curvature radius R = 30 mm
An ultrasonic transducer is a device that converts AC into ultrasound, as well as the reverse, sound into AC. In ultrasonics, the term typically refers to piezoelectric transducers or capacitive transducers. Piezoelectric crystals change size and shape when a
Since piezoelectric materials generate a voltage when force is applied to them, they can also work as ultrasonic detectors. Some systems use separate transmitters and receivers, while others combine both functions into a single piezoelectric transceiver.

Ultrasound transmitters can also use non-piezoelectric principles. such as magnetostriction. Materials with this property change size slightly when exposed to a magnetic field, and make practical transducers.

A capacitor ("condenser") microphone has a thin diaphragm that responds to ultrasound waves. Changes in the electric field between the diaphragm and a closely spaced backing plate convert
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0h42yRWIt0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Va3uKE_RTOQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YErKnzyjxr4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odfJuwWoq6E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uti3vhwtYHQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtM4EB3zhn4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e70jQ4nND0Q
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZk0EuuXCiU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c76yT2DslP8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V5ZC5LsWhI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFl_8r29Y00
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